I want to build an soldering iron

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Brana
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I want to build an soldering iron

Post by Brana » Sat Nov 24, 2018 5:53 am

Yes, I want to build an soldering iron... :)
...And the first step is to - turn On the Euphoric :D

So I created (first) the following program:
It is on Serbian (sorry about that!) but it is really so simple stuff.

- Enter ANY desired two values on the left
(Use Up/Down arrow keys to move, Enter to - enter the value, R to restart).
- As soon as at least two values are entered, program will then calculate all other needed values on the right side.

My soldering Iron should work on 12 Volts
And I would like to have 30 Watts of power.

So (on the left side) I enter 12 Volts And 30 Watts.

And I get 4,8 Ohms impedance for the soldering iron needed,
With the power adapter of 2,5 Ampers strength

CAN ANYONE CONFIRM THIS IS CORRECT?
Really? :)

Source for building the program was Wikipedia and
https://www.automatika.rs/baza-znanja/e ... zakon.html
Attachments
unimer.tap
Program
(8.1 KiB) Downloaded 15 times
unimer.tap
(8.1 KiB) Downloaded 16 times
SCREEN1 copy.jpg
screenshot
SCREEN1 copy.jpg (25.37 KiB) Viewed 440 times
Last edited by Brana on Mon Nov 26, 2018 1:41 am, edited 7 times in total.

Brana
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Posts: 159
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:30 pm
Contact:

Re: I want to build an soldering iron

Post by Brana » Sat Nov 24, 2018 3:21 pm

It IS correct! :) :) :)
According to HIS calculator at 02:00

:) :) :)

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retroric
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Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 4:33 pm
Location: Paris, France

Re: I want to build an soldering iron

Post by retroric » Mon Nov 26, 2018 1:46 am

Well Brana,
I'm not very skilled in electricity or in electronics, but according to the basic Ohm law, yes, your calculations are correct for your example:

Known values:
P = 30 W
U = 12 V

Using the P = U x I equation we can then compute I = P / U = 30 / 12 = 2.5 A

Then using the U = R x I equation we can finally compute R = U / I = 12 / 2.5 = 4.8 Ohm

All good ! :D
flag_fr RetrOric, aka laurentd75 flag_uk
            GitHub - RetrOric

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